in ,

Grace Bailey Schooner Accident: 1 Dead, Several Injured After Mast Snaps Aboard Historic Maine Schooner at Rockland Maine

Grace Bailey Schooner Accident: 1 Dead, Several Injured After Mast Snaps Aboard Historic Maine Schooner at Rockland Maine

Grace Bailey Accident: One person is dead and three others are injured following a schooner accident in Maine’s Rockland Harbour.

The U.S. Coast Guard learned about a large sailboat in distress just outside the Breakwater at about 10:30 a.m. Monday.

The mainmast on the 118-foot-long Grace Bailey, which has an 80-foot deck, snapped and the Coast Guard had reports of multiple people hurt. Rockland rescue personnel were transported out to the boat with the Coast Guard to help care for the injured and coordinate medical care once they could get back to the mainland.

The Coast Guard said there were 33 people on board the schooner at the time. The owners of the boat say they were returning from a four-day cruise when there was an “unexpected and catastrophic failure” of the mainmast, causing it to split and come down onto the deck.

Three people were transported from the Coast Guard pier, where two were brought to Penbay Medical Centre in Rockport and one to an awaiting LifeFlight helicopter. One other person died of their injuries. The three people who were taken to the hospital were expected to recover.

Officials did not immediately release the names of the injured parties.

“My crew and I are devastated by this morning’s accident, especially since the safety of our guests is always our biggest priority. Most importantly, we are beyond heartbroken that we lost a dear friend. Our entire crew extends our love and support to the family members and to everyone affected by this tragedy,” said Captain Sam Sikkema.

The Grace Bailey was built in Long Island, New York, in 1882 and is owned in part by actor Mark Evan Jackson, who is known for his roles on “Brooklyn Nine-Nine,” “The Good Place,” “Parks & Recreation,” “The Baby-Sitters Club,” and more.

The Grace Bailey, part of Maine’s so-called windjammer fleet, offers three- to six-night vacation trips along the state’s coastline.

The schooner’s operators said they had no idea why the mast failed. They said the Coast Guard will conduct a full investigation into the incident.